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San Diego Trolley - Consumer-friendly?

Posted by Dave Smith On 6/25/2007 10:18:00 AM 5 comments

While I'm airing complaints... I was amazed to see that the San Diego Trolley system does not accept credit or debit cards for purchases. So cash only. And then, they don't give out any more than $5 in change (maybe all you have is a $20...)

Further still, they give change in those cheeezy new $1 coins that look like arcade game tokens (at least the Sacajawea dollars had some aesthetic...)

Also, they don't seem to have a 5-day or week pass right front and center. I ended up having to get a 4-day pass and then wing it on an individual fare for the last day.


Not exactly consumer-friendly or commuter-friendly, unless you get a more permanent pass...

5 Response for the " San Diego Trolley - Consumer-friendly? "

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  2. Anonymous says:

    This is California. We don't do public transport. It's all just for show.

  3. Anonymous says:

    Why do we still print one dollar bills

  4. Last I checked, San Diego's public transport is one of the most expensive as well as one of the most inefficient in all the U States. Those of us that live here have been wondering for years why the trolley goes straight to the mall while the morning commutes are increasingly tragic.

  5. Actually, San Diego's transit system IS one of the most effecient in the US. The Blue Line carries over 60,000 riders a day!

    The farebox return ratio is up around 35% whereas many many other transit agency's is much lower; San Jose's system has a 16% farebox return ratio.

    Farebox return ratio is basically the pecent that fares cover the cost to operate the system.

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